Connor's Breeder's Response to the Conformation Post

There are two things I hope you take from this blog: one is that Welsh Cobs are awesome, and the other is that good, intelligent breeders matter so much to the future of the horse industry.  In a well-traveled world where one stallion can ruin a breed, breeders with a goal in mind that are willing to ruthlessly cull their herd to achieve that goal matter more than ever.  Connor's breeder, Lisa, commented in response to questions asked in my "Sunday Conformation Series #3: Connor" post, and I wanted to share it as a post, because it's really an incredible statement on her breeding program.   SUPPORT YOUR BREEDERS!!!


Connor's sire, *Tuscani Dundee

"Hi All, I just saw this tonight. I'll try to answer any and all questions. First, an absolutely perfectly conformed horse does not exist in my eyes, though I have seen some that were very close to my ideal. Connor was gelded because of his head, shoulder and croup. None of these are bad, yet they are not my ideal. I feel a stallion should be VERY tough to fault. 


Connor's full brother, stallion Castleberry's Cadence (age 4)
As years have passed, I am becoming a little more forgiving of some slight conformational imperfections. Some of the best producers that I have seen were not the prettiest of "ponies", yet they, and those in their pedigrees produced champion after champion. Connor's brother, Cadence, is still a stallion mostly because he is the last and only stud of that line. Connor has full siblings that are National Halter Champions, (Heck, Connor was Reserve Supreme Halter Champion of over 100 ponies when he was only 4-1/2 months old! It was his day. He really showed off!) Dressage Pony Cup Champions and there are several half siblings doing CDE's, eventing (Go Connor) and also being their owner's (both adults and children) best friend and safe companion. 


I'm realizing the temperament/trainability and willingness of this line NEEDS to be passed on, even if the croup is a little steeper than I like, or the ears are longer than they should be. This line CARES about their rider. Many Cobs do, so they are not very tolerant of abuse. Honest mistakes? Yes, they get that and are very forgiving and will keep trying to figure out what you're asking them to do. If you try to lord it over them, they probably won't tolerate it for long. 


Castleberry's Crackerjack, CDE competitor

Baby Connor at the show Lisa
mentioned, where he was Reserve
Champion out of 100 ponies.
My passion is the Welsh Cobs. In the last couple of years I have produced the Cob x Warmblood cross. This is a FANTASTIC combination, with the best of both worlds coming out in the offspring. This year I took it a step further and produced two, 3/4 Cob x 1/4 WB. I like this cross even better than the 1/2 & 1/2, as the babies are much like BIG Cobs. My passion is still with the Cobs, but in this terrible economy, breeders are not buying. Performance people are still buying, but usually not until the babies are 2-3 yrs old. Many people want a taller Cob, which is why I've recently focused on the crosses. The good, correct Cob is still where it's at in my book. We have only one foal coming next year. It is a purebred and not for sale. I will only be breeding purebreds next year as well. Their purpose will be to continue the bloodlines of some very rare and special imported lines. The Welsh Cob is where it's at for me. They are the most multi-purpose, extremely athletic, easy keeping, amateur-friendly and FUN breed I have ever had the pleasure of working with. They are the foundation for me, and would likely improve on any cross.

This post was way too lengthy, which is why I seldom post." 

(Jen in: THANK YOU for the lengthy post, it was amazing!)

20 comments:

  1. Thanks for sharing....this makes me even more excited to own a cob! :) Also, Connor's sire is gorgeous!

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    1. You're welcome, I'm glad you get to share in the fun! Connor's sire is like nothing I've ever seen before. I'm happy to know him.

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  2. Love this post, and this breeder sounds completely awesome. I wish more people were as devoted and passionate about it as her.

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    1. She IS completely awesome! I do as well. She puts so much thought, years worth, into every cross she makes, more people should think like she does.

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  3. Great post! I absolutely love her ponies. Maybe one day....:)

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    1. I know someone that would make a great second horse...since you're maybe looking and all... ;-)

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  4. What a great breeder! Love that the Cobs are so versatile :)

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    1. She is awesome, and they are awesome. :-)

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  5. Very cool. Glad you are so tied in with Connor's history.

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    1. It's fun and unusual, since this is the first pet I've had that wasn't a rescue.

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  6. I am glad Lisa chimed in. Every time we talk breeding I am impressed with the thought she puts into each match. I was glad we were able to use the Castleberrys prefix for Roscoe. If not for her, I would not have even considered leaving Roscoe intact or spent the money for phantom training.
    Plus I am super glad she gelded Comrade (Connor's brother) even though she really did not want to because his sale brought the Welsh Cob to our attention. I can't imagine life w/o a Cob.

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    1. I'm so glad you're leaving Roscoe intact, too. He's really something special. I can't imagine life without them either.

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  7. So awesome! She sounds like a stellar breeder who is making smart decisions.

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  8. Wow! Great post! I saw Castleberry's Crackerjack go at the Glen Willow CDE I want to this summer and he was absolutely to die for.

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    1. Wow, seriously?! That's awesome! I have never met him in real life, but his CDE videos are amazing. I'm jealous!

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  9. Awesome post/response! Thanks for sharing! I love cobs and had a 1/2 cob as a kid. Best pony ever!!!

    Also amazing to hear from a responsible breeder. Not enough of those out there!

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    1. You're welcome! Cobs really are awesome, how much fun was that to have one as a kid?! I only discovered them as an adult.

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  10. So I am ignorant about cobs except through your blog. If I wanted one in the future for me or my daughters, how much do I need to plan on spending? Obviously price varies with training, but ballpark?

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  11. Hey Heidi,
    They are a little more expensive than other breeds, but I like to tell people you'll make up for the purchase price in not needing shoes, a lot of feed, a lot of vet visits and a lot of hospital visits. ;) You might be able to find one for $3k but mostly $5k and up. What a great first kid's pony! If you are ever going to purchase, talk to me and Connor's breeder, even if she doesn't have anything she's really well connected with most of the Welsh Cob breeders in the country.

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